Regulating E-liquid

The amount of e-juice being vaped by vapers worldwide is causing concern for the regulators, whose goal is to oversee and govern safe usage of vaporizing devices in a market with rapidly increasing scope and value. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) are planning on regulating e-liquid and nicotine delivery devices.

Hardy regulation is likely to mean that current product lines and marketing strategies will have to being altered in order to conform with the newly proposed legislation. Vaping brands like VIP, Blu, Apollo and V2 may have to conceive innovative tactics, overhaul product design and rethink advertising ploys to ensure they operate above-board following 2016’s regulatory revamp.

Industry members, for the most part, have succumbed to the realisation that the pervasive regulatory bodies’ influence is soon to change the market they currently flourish within. Though not all have lost faith so quickly, and some are making last ditch attempts at saving the nature of the largely ‘free’ market they profit from so greatly.

There is plenty of anti-regulation protest online, predicting a move towards cheap black-market products and the criminalisation of vapers, and a continuation or even worsening of tobacco smoking addiction and related illness if the option of affordable harm-reduction is curtailed.

There is a consensus that the FDA are not trustworthy impartial adjudicators when it comes to governing such a valuable and profitable industry. They are accused of colluding with the tobacco industry giants to put profits before public health in the past, so why should this change in the present day.

Well there are a lot more media outlets reporting on this new industry, mainly online sources reporting independently to a much wider audience. This will make it harder for collusion to take place but certainly not impossible, as the level of power and monetary value of the industry are so great that the temptation for greed to interfere with decision making process may prove too enticing.

 

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